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and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
you in, harris. thank you for joining us. "america live" starts right now. >> fox news extreme weather alert on the deadly storm that has caused major problems from texas to the northeast the storm is now blamed for a total of 15 deaths. whipping up tornados in the south, strong winds and rain along the atlantic coastline and dumping heavy snow from the plains to new england. the northeast getting hammered today. some areas are seeing more than a foot of snow while others deal with a heavy wind-swept rain leading to big airport delays in ohio, more than a thousand trucks are sent out, some getting heavy police escort as winds cause zero visibility. drivers say the situation is awful. >> i have seen 10 cars in an accident. i have saw a lexus fly into a ditch. i saw a semi-truck jackknife. all kinds of stuff. >> i have lost count of the number of cars i've seen in the ditch. i saw a jackknifed tractor-trailer. i saw a horse trailer that was turned over. so i think people are just not really driving slow enough for the conditions. >> pretty rough. we've seen a lot of accidents thus far in
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
about in you're so vain and will you share that with us? >> i think it's warren beatty. >> and he says not. >> that's what my information was but again that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the
. this bill allows us to have the resources we need to get more uninsured americans into the health-care system. it reduces costs and will make as a stronger nation. >> peter shumlin is joining us from vermont. thank you very much for being with us. >> thanks so much for having me. >> why did he decide to take this job? >> it is a fascinating question. they're going to start this cycle $30 million a behind were the republican governors association is. they have opportunities across the upper midwest and states like florida and on the west coast. the governor of arizona is not so convinced she% limited. she think she can run. sheikh -- she is a term limited. she thinks she can run. even some states in the south and along the atlantic coast. there are tons of opportunities for democrats. they are $30 million were the republicans governors association is. >> a lot of democratic senators are up for reelection. the pool of money will be pushed also for these governors races and more democratic than republican seat in the senate. >> there arare far more democrat of for reelection in 2014
since 2008 but going over the fiscal cliff puts us at peril in terms of lower income and higher regulatory burdens and just the uncertainty. >> brian, sometimes the media gets the blame for scare mongering and i'm going to therefore try to play the other side and the devil's advocate. is there a possibility that this fiscal cliff talk is a y2k moment? in other words, it's not going to be nearly as bad as we think? >> oh, i think that's a possibility. i think maybe there's a little bit of cynicism in the market and a lot of people in the sidelines which is one of the reasons why the vix is as low as it is. compare this to the negotiations surrounding the extension of the debt ceiling back in august of last year. nothing like the turmoil that's been there. i think a lot has already been baked into the cake. i think right nprobably to the extent there's the stage set for further negotiations for a grand bargain to set more permanent parameters on tax and spending policy. >> is there anything that's immune to the fiscal cliff talk, anything you would buy right here? >> well, i would
at the history of what has been done. there is a long history of using that debt limit as a moment to distract from the party in power. if we had an academic seminar on the impact of the that struggle and the fiscal policy, he would say that it was a negative thing. >> well, i have never until last year of august 2011, i have not seen any serious effort or serious threat made by the leadership of congress to refuse to give the secretary of treasury the ability to offer to meet obligations congress had adopted. i thought that was a new experience for us. it certainly was for me to see that happen. dr. zandi, you said you think that we need to repeal this law that tries to set a debt limit and concentrate more on taxing and spending policies that causes to raise the debt, as i understand? >> absolutely. it is a bad way to conduct policy. it is a problem. look at july and august of 2011. it was a mess. gdp downgraded the debt. it really had an impact. cbo is estimating the interest costs is costing us money. it is pretty clear that this is not going to get any better going forward. it will be wor
the other lesson learned for us is to look beyond the tactical level of training that's provided by the department of defense to consider what ways we might also engage in terms of institutional development with the defense institutions and that's something in the last several years where we are ramping up in the department of the ability to provide advisers and other types of institutional reform engagement with various military partners to ensure that just as we are looking at strengthening of the tactical level we are also focusing on the institutional strength of these defense institutions. >> ms. dory can we afford to wait a year for planning, training, assembly of a regional force for the completion of negotiations for the successful election in some press accounts aqim is described as this point the best funded and best equipped most potentially lethal affiliate in the world and those accounts are overblown but the suggestion is we should have an area the size of texas controlled by terrorists engaged in drug trafficking and kidnappings that have had an inflow of some soph
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
just how nonlife- u.s. unemployment benefits are. a lot of the against -- non- lavish u.s. unemployment benefits are. the two countries that he mentioned, the netherlands and belgium, they're doing much better than other continental european countries. the scandinavian countries have guest: there is not this simple relationship that have been extensive unemployment insurance system and you mechanically generate a higher unemployment rate. host: lisa from dallas, texas, received unemployment insurance -- nate from dallas, texas, receives unemployment insurance. caller: right now i lost my job because my boss was fired from the university. and recently got my doctoral degree from that university, and i am spending eight hours a day on the computer, trying to network. i want to buck the contention that it is a mismatch of skills between the employer and the people that are unemployed. there was a recent "wall street journal" saying that part of the problem is how employers conduct searches of candidates, and her recruiting is done. -- how recruiting is done. i think the unemployment benefi
will come here to washington and ask us to help them out from their bad decisions. i hope at that time that we can show by pointing at these states and these right ideas that we know the solutions at the state level and that we also know that we can change how we think here at the federal level and make our country work a lot better. i i leave here with a lot of respect for my colleagues. i know my democrat colleagues believe with conviction their ideas. and i know my republican colleagues do too. but i hope we can look at the facts. i hope we can look at the real world. i hope we can look at what's working and set aside the politics and realize what really makes this country great and strong is when we move dollars and decisions out of washington back to people and communities and to states, that it works. not for 2% but for 100% of americans. i feel like our customers in the senate, at the heritage foundation, or wherever we go, are 100% of americans who these ideas can work for to build a better future and a stronger america. and i'm not leaving the fight. i hope to raise my game at
gdp, the entire economic output of the u.s. they have come down a little bit. economists think to be sustainable, budget deficits have to be in the range of 3% of economic output or a lower. the focus of this effort to reduce deficits now is on getting them, in the federal budget deficit to the range of 3% or so. that is what i mean when i say policymakers are not trying to get rid of the budget deficits. given the economic weakness, a little bit of deficit spending is probably not a terrible thing, at least in the eyes of some budget economists. i think there would be comfort in washington around 3% of gdp. getting there is a big challenge. there are problems with medicare and social security. they are facing big deficit situations. host: what motivates the creation of deductions? what about the other incentives? mortgage deduction it to encourage people to buy a home. guest: some of the deductions have been around forever, since the invention of the income tax. there has always been a deduction for interest that you paid. the government didn't think it could distinguish betwe
is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the u.s. health-care industry. dr. marty makary on what hospitals will not tell you, tonight it 10:00 -- at 10:00. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008, and they will say that this precedent. and indiana had -- >> when we talk about the facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i.d. states who have subsequently -- >> correct, they talked about indiana -- let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people -- voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities -- it seems to me somehow we have something missing in our brain. to me, if white americans can go throughto voting all the processes to follow the laws, what are you telling black people? that somehow they are not good enough? that is what bothers me about a lot of the rhetoric coming from democrats and the left, that we always have to make special -- you know, there has to be a specialness when we deal with
into the cooler, got all of the employees in the cooler, and it came right over us. >> it blew the roofs off of homes, and on this christmas day, not even a house of worship was safe. the front wall was torn off. >> look at that tornado. >> across much of the south, many spent christmas in the dark as twisters came through. >>> tornado winds in mississippi damaged homes, and two men were killed from falling trees. >> it's a mess. >> as a funnel cloud came from mobile joe michael love shot this video from his home. >> what was that? >> that's transformers. >> i'm at my son's high school it's pretty destroyed. all of the portable classrooms are gone. >> reporter: and no serious injuries reported here but it is daylight and crews are now back out assessing the situation. >> thank you, the rough weather is affecting travel across the country. more than 500 flights were cancels onled on christmas day. tiffany wilson is in oxford ohio. the snow started falling around 5:00 this morning, you see the blows have just gone through, we have a couple inches of snow blizzard like condit
of us who had the privilege to serve with you. i hope and i pray that god will give you and your wife many, many more years of life and enjoyment because you have certainly earned it, because you have served not only the united states house of representatives, but you have served us, you have served the people of our districts as well as helping us be better members of congress. so with that i will close by asking god to please bless you and your family and may god continue to bless the house of representatives and jay pearson, you will be in our hearts until the day we die. god bless you. . mr. woodall: at this time, it's migrate pleasure to yield the gentleman from california, chairman of the ways and means health subcommittee, mr. herger. mr. herger: i thank my good friend. how wonderful it is to be able to sit here and listen to all these incredibly warm remarks from people who, like myself, know and love jay pearson. and there's a reason for that. jay, you're one of the best of the best. and i think, it's hard to believe that 26 years comes and goes so very, very quickly, but it
is used to guide us, but a waste of money. the government should be involved in the. unfortunately, there are times when people evaluate investments that help our poorest children, the people in the toughest, most disadvantaged neighborhoods, some of our most intractable problems even with, for example, young people rescued from trafficking. these are very, very difficult problems. and we should evaluate and see what works. but we should also insist again there's not a double standard, so that if an evaluation, single evaluation or even a couple of evaluations somehow show that a particular strategy is not worth well, that is a motivation to do things better and smarter, not an excuse or reason to say government has no business being involved in that endeavor. so i think we need to be more change, accountability, evaluation, but not a tougher, higher double standard just when it comes to young people from the most disadvantaged and troubled environment. so there is so much to talk about in the innovation area. let me just mention a few things that we are focused on and then we can
't happen again. >> clifton truman daniel will join us to discuss the inspiration for his trip sunday at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span3. >> a report by the group securing america's future energy says the greatest threat to national and economic security is dependence on foreign oil. members of the group, business political and retired military leaders are suggesting a plan of maximizing oil and gas production, reducing consumption, and improving conservation as a way to boost revenue and reduce our debt. this is a little less than an hour and a half. >> good morning, everyone. thank you all for coming. i especially want to thank the members of the leadership council that could be with us here today. they've been a distinguished group of people working on this issue since 2006. we're nothing without their credibility as the great c.e.o.'s, entrepreneurs and military leaders of our time. i also want to give a special thanks to the staff at securing america's future energy. really we stand on their shoulders, all of us, and the hard work that they -- and the time that they spent to put these re
later, we will discuss the recent increase in u.s. manufacturing. we will also take your calls, e- mails and tweets. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning, it's wednesday, december 19, 2012. the white house has thrown its support behind several gun- control measures on tuesday in the wake of the shooting rampage in newtown, connecticut. a state department inquiry into the september 11 terror attack in benghazi, libya, criticized the agency harshly for inadequate security that -- but specificrecommend signi individuals. and we begin today in on the details of john boehner's plan to avoid the fiscal cliff. we want to hear from you. how optimistic are you that a compromise can still be reached before the end of the year? give us a call -- and you can get up with us on all your social media web sites on facebook and twitter, or e- mail us. a very good morning to you. i want to take you to the lead story in today's washington post. that was today's washington post. here's the headlines from "politico" today. i want to take you to speaker john boehner's comments on the state
pushing us along throughout this entire last six months. lori: absolutely. thank you so much, nicole petallides on the floor of the new york stock exchange. protests turn violent in lansing, michigan, as union protesters ripped down a tent belonging to right-to-work supporters. becoming the 24th right-to-work states today allowing workers to get the right to join unions. jeff flock is in lansing michigan covering the story for us. i thought it was interesting how you covered the scene there with michigan a few years back, excuse me, wisconsin. >> wisconsin, exactly. not the same kind of intensity. part of that is because this is already pretty much a done deal. there they had not a teacher headed off. the second one being debated right now. but renew over here to the scene of the george romney state office building. george romney, former governor of wisconsin, and father of mitt romney. the large group of protesters are trying to get into the crowd and see. they have essentially ringed the entrance of the building trying to make their voices heard. they feel very frustrated. they fee
for the fallout. tampa mayor tells us what the fiscal cliff means for his city. lori: all talking and no advancement towards a deal. frustrating. on and on and on those politicians go. we will bring you an update. tom corbett saying going over that cliff would be "absolutely frightening for the keystone state." he will join us later. melissa: president obama has been named person of the year. go figure. [talking over each other] lori: was i on the list for rock. melissa: on top. lori: let's get you updated on the markets. lauren simonetti is covering stocks for us today. >> we go break a two-day winning streak. for the s&p, it has been the best two days in more than a month. we are still a little bit more positive. traders kind of sitting on their hands digesting what we have recently had. if you look at, i say risk on because the sectors that are doing well today are once again energy and thanks. utilities not putting in a good performance today. gm shares are up tremendously right now. they took out their highest level in 19 month old little bit earlier today. this on news that
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
martha: thanks for being with us, everybody. the driving dogs has to wait unfor the in the leave. it's outstanding we'll catch you on the radio in about 20 minutes. martha: see you there, by, guys. jenna: breaking information in the benghazi terror investigation, as we await news from a bipartisan classified briefing on that deadly attack back on september 11th when terrorists killed four americans, including our ambassador to libya. we are staking out the hearing if case any lawmakers decide to talk. catherine herridge will bring us a live report a little later on in the show. >> reporter: i want to go live to the president who is speaking before a group of business leaders, let's listen in. >> it's good to be back at the business roundtable. jim, thanks for your leadership. originally my team had prepared some remarks, they always get nervous when -- when i'm out there on my own, you never know what i might say. but given the dialogue that we had the last time i thought it was useful for me to abbreviate my remarks, speak off the cuff at the top and spend most of our time just
and be willing to negotiate on spending. >> i see the future. the president lets us go over and then proposes a tax cut for the lower 98%. >> could you vote against it? >> he could do that for the two -- the two top rates is $400 billion. but he's got to do something on spending to address the problem. >> thank you, senator, for your time. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." >>> good monday morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." we're here at the new york stock exchange. let's get a check on how we're setting up for the first trading session of the week. we certainly have a lot to chew on over the weekend with the sunday talk shows, focusing on the fiscal cliff. it looks like we're looking at a lower open for the dow. as for the action in europe, really, the action focuses on italy where there's an impending political regime change. more on that in just a moment. the road map starts at the golden arches. mcdonald's blowing out expectations for november sales after the dismal drop in the month of october. hoping to fuel the rise, the bacon/onion/cheddar sandwich. >> there's on
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
as difficult as one. we are sorry jeanne could be with us but we're fortunate to have represented schwarz with as representing a dish in philadelphia, and urban philadelphia, vice ranking democratic member on the committee on the ways and means committee. i want to have a conversation, that reflects kind of the dual nature of the to do list that the public can send it in the pulpit on the one hand when you ask them the most immediate challenge in washington today, with the most wanted ashington to do, they to talk about deficit or the debt, getting the fiscal house in order. but that is not the full extent. right behind that is education, retirement, good paying jobs with very different by the way, talk about priorities along partisan and racial lines. let's start with where we are and where the public not surprisingly is on the question of solving the immediate fiscal cliff decision. how would you describe your feeling that there will be some kind of accommodation deals these on the tax or the spending side, or both? >> first of all, good morning. and just, i'm not gene sperling. but i'm
twitter, a post a comment on facebook, or write us an e-mail. the theme of optimism or lack of it is prevalent in the papers. wednesday with congress and the president heading back to washington. here is a headline on "usa today." in the wall street journal -- if the in "the washington post." we welcome your phone calls. we will get to them in a moment. we did find another piece at politico. there you have it in the papers this morning about people being optimistic or pessimistic about things. i want to dig a little bit deeper into "the wall street journal" piece. i we will probably see some what of a flurry of activity tomorrow. if first call. what is your name and where are you calling from? i think that caller is gone. let's try the next call. caller: i am optimistic because this is a great country. we are one nation under god that. i think people ought to turn to their faith during these times because we have always needed to through hard times. host: how will this play in washington but the fiscal glove? caller: i think the republicans are going to have to give it more
into this bill and the way he's worked cooperatively with all of us on both sides of the aisle and madam speaker, i urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this bill and i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chair will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the nat has passed without amendment h.r. 3641, cited as the national park act. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. >> i have no fufert speakers and reserve the balance -- mr. chaffetz: i have no further speakers and reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from the district of columbia. ms. norton: i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from utah. mr. chaffetz: i would like to thank representative poe for introducing this legislation. the intill bipartisan in its approach, it creates a means for properly commemorating the cent
. >>> it took us three months to establish trust. these guys don't trust each other. they don't even trust each other in their own party. you've got leaders who, people behind them with a shif hoping they can get their job the next go 'round. poor old durbin has people over his back because he voted for this package. and the republicans, boehner's got to go to work and come back, and now there's 70 of them left, the tea party guys. these are guys who went to congress not to limit government but to stop it. so what are you going to do? we've got five democrats, five republicans who range from dick durbin of illinois, great progressive democrat, and coburn of oklahoma, a progressive conservative, and five dems, five republicans, one independent, that's a super majority. and for god's sake, the reason we were so successful is we effectively pissed off everybody in america. >> congratulations, sir. kudos. kudos to you. >> good morning. it's thursday, december 6th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set, msnbc political analyst, former democratic congressman, harold ford jr. >> mr. professor. >> g
. >> that is it for us here at "money in motion." your next chance for a trade sunday afternoon. cnbc. have a great weekend. >>> i'm jim cramer, and welcome to my world. >> you need to get in the game. >> firms are going to go out of business, and he's nuts! they're nuts! they know nothing! >> i always like to say there's a bull market somewhere and i -- >> "mad money." you can't afford to miss it. >>> hey, i'm cramer. welcome to "mad money." welcome to cramerica. other people want to make friends. i'm just trying to help you save some money. my job is not just to entertain you but i'm trying to educate and teach you. call me. 1-800-743-cnbc. you want to get a sense of just how important this -- i hate to even say it anymore -- fiscal cliff is? today we got an incredible employment report from the labor department. with 146,000 new jobs. i was looking for 90,000. the unemployment rate dropping to 7.7. i thought it might be 8%. and all this despite the effects of hurricane sandy. who knows how high we could have been if it weren't for that darn hurricane? yet the market barely blinked. yet the poten
. it used to be a staple of small- business lending. you have a track record, a clear plan, they will make you a loan on your ability to pursue that. that is gone. they are in the same boat. they cannot get the loan. >> i am curious from the small business perspective, i think small businesses are coming up a lot right now as we talk about tax rates and making sure you protect small businesses. do you feel the issue is the most crucial for small businesses, or is it things like financing the -- >> rates are important on the tax front for small companies, i think the most important things are having a long-term sense of the code and try to grapple with tax reform to simplify the code. a center of our own polling, yes, they do not like playing -- paying the tax rates. the bigger thing is the burden of complying with the tax code the half. you have to remember small business people pay taxes at individual rates. they do not populate their income the same way individuals do. they have to deal with the business side to see what their tax code is. they also pay the taxes themselves. like most wo
-- please give them a big round of applause. [applause] i want to thank martin for hosting us. i want to thank jeff and gibby for giving me a great tour of the factory. [applause] i've got to say i love coming to factories. >> i love you! >> i love you. so in addition to seeing the best workers in the world -- you've also got all this cool equipment. [laughter] i wanted to try out some of the equipment, but secret service wouldn't let me. [laughter] they said, you're going to drop something on your head, hurt yourself. [laughter] they were worried i'd mess something up. and jeff and gibby may not admit it, but i think they were pretty happy the secret service wouldn't let me touch the equipment. now, it's been a little over a month since the election came to an end. [applause] so it's now safe for you to turn your televisions back on. [laughter] all those scary political ads are off the air. you can answer your phone again -- nobody is calling you in the middle of dinner asking for your support. but, look, i have to admit there's one part of the campaign that i miss, and that is it is
. the second deadline that comes along as february 15, next year. that is when we have asked states to tell us they want to be a denture a partnership exchange. we will know more as far as how many work with us. >> thank you for being here and congratulations on the work in maryland. we are very proud of that. i wanted to ask you in view of the fact states will be making a judgment on whether they can stand up to a state based exchange, and another basis we will be looking at the partnership model, you spoke with your colleagues around the country who are making these decisions. what are the kinds of it zaidi's they express to you that you are able to say, look, there is a way to do this. rather it is a certain technical thing or the process of how you get a consensus behind it and get people comfortable moving forward, what are you saying to your colleagues who may be one to get there but are worried a little bit about it based on the maryland experience, it can give them some comfort and confidence they can do this? >> thank you for your question and your leadership in maryland. there is a l
. >> because you're using the driver's license number or last four digits of your social security number and checking that. before that envelope is opened they check that against the statewide voter data fwace where your signature exists on electronic file and where all of that information exists or the physical copy of it. that's the same thing if you vote by mail. again, you don't leave home to vote in ohio. we have an entire buffet of options for voting and we have built in safeguards for doing so. >> that discussion just got extremely technical. >> it did. sorry. >> but there's a point to be made i think from how technical that discussion was. who are the people who are going to be implementing an i.d. requirement on election day? they are poll workers who work once or twice a year, get paid very little money and it's tough. and to be a poll worker. and it's tough with all these rules and the more technical they get, the more mistakes will be made. i wonder if there's something that just cries out for simplicity in terms of i.d. requirements, and maybe no i.d. requirements because it
they need. they have to tell us. then we have to take a look at it and see if it makes sense for the american public. >> when will we see people putting something on the table or is that not going to happen until like the 30th, 31st of the month? >> well, what i would say is in the white house's initial offer they did offer $400 billion in medicare cuts. and that is something that i think the republicans should actually like as a starting point because clearly the white house knows that they are going to have to go up from there. and bob corker the senator from tennessee who was also on "meet the press" yesterday has proposed some legislation that instead cuts $641 million out of medicare. we'll see some scale up in that direction. there are some things that republicans could like in that initial bid. >> let me bring in congresswoman karen bass. so you're hearing all the sides going back and forth but the one thing that everybody seems to just about agree on is that we're not getting anywhere fast. lindsey graham says we're going over the cliff among others. what do you think
-class families. the wealthiest among us can help us reduce the debt by paying more. it is encouraging to see republican members of the house and the senate speak out on the need or a deficit approach that includes raising taxes on wealthy individuals and to moving right away to ensure that 98% of families do not race a tax increase. we need to look -- do not face a tax increase. we need to look at history. what we saw in the 1990s and 2000s, there was no relationship between lower marginal tax rates for the wealthiest among us an economic growth. first during the clinton administration, the top marginal tax rate was raised on the wealthiest individuals and the economy grew at its fastest rate in a generation. it added more than 22 million jobs. during the following eight years, the top marginal rate dax tax rate was lower, but economy never regained its strength from the reviews decade. middle-class families are vulnerable when the recession began at the end of 2007. i hope this hearing is helpful not just in this hearing, but across this country to people who are watching and waiting for co
's a -- how many times can you tell us that monster drinks aren't any worse and may actually be better than a cup of joe from starbucks? let us count the ways that this analyst meeting slash lovefest, they will tell you that there's no better way to preserve your heart than to drink a taste of monster every morning. now, analysts will be plenty hopped up when they come out of this meeting because they'll be recommending this stock in high-speed fashion. next on wednesday we're going to get the results from joy global. here's the company that has the best read on chinese growth of all the companies i follow. in fact, joy global called the bottom in the slide over there by analyzing data on chinese electricity use. can't be jiggered. people think this is an original equipment business, but i've got to tell you once again we're going to hear from the straight-shooting ceo michael sutherland that maintenance is more important. maintaining it is the equivalent. i'm going to listen to what he says about india. we don't talk about india enough. they are like coal junkies over there. it's like get
. the guy in the back. >> is today the ambassador to syria reiterated the fear that if the u.s. provides weapons to the syrian opposition they will wind up in the hands of extremists. i was wondering if you could speak about what the new coalition is specifically doing to build a closer relationship with the three syrian army and various militias fighting on the ground. it seems more likely the syrian opposition will receive assistance if the new coalition can show they are in away unified with the people doing the fighting. >> thank you. >> the u.s. position has been repeated many times that we will not give assistance, it may go to the wrong hands. if the u.s. stays in its position, they are getting the money from some groups in the gulf countries or in other areas. you can play a role in the transition rather than waiting until the transition is done. the lack of support, we see the increasing influence of t. this is the fear we have. this is a shared concern of the international community. we do not need the nature of the syrian people -- committed to the international community and
appreciate it very much. join us on wednesday. happy holidays. "squawk on the street" starts right now. >> can't wait to see what jason got us here. welcome to "squawk on the street" on this final trading day before christmas. i'm carl, with melissa lee, david faber at the nyse. the new york stock exchange and nasdaq closing at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. the futures, a little bit of weakness here which we'll talk about in a minute, after it comes after a pretty bad day on friday. the european markets closed for the christmas eve holidays. london, paris, spain have each completed shortened sessions in light of the christmas holiday as well. the friday sell-off, only five trading days are left in the year. is the market getting used to the idea that a fiscal cliff solution will not happen before year end? >> only a few hours remain to finish your christmas shopping. but some words of caution for toymakers. are tablets and apps ruining the season as kids get more accustomed to technology? >> microsoft windows 8 gets more bad press today, as "the new york times" said it is not leading to a bo
, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfort and pray." national newspapers also digging into this story. "the new york times" says that the peopl
. obama for america is using its campaign e-mail list to put pressure on lawmakers to extend the bush tax cuts for the middle class. the latest from stephanie cutter includes a two-minute video reminding voters that the president campaign and won on that same platform. >> obama: we need to give tax relief to working families trying to raise their kids to keep them healthy send them to college, keep a roof over their heads. that's the choice in this election. >> the administration is still asking you to send in stories about what being able to keep about $2,000 more a year means to you and your family. the president is planning to meet with state governors this week and the business roundtable, a big business lobbying group. this morning fiscal cliff negotiations appear to be at a stand still. treasury secretary tim geithner says the president's offer is unwavering. we're going to let tax rates go up for top earners and republicans will have to work with that reality. >> there is no responsible way we can
to the atmosphere. on the other hand, people who are living in a western-style exist then use a lot more energy than people in the developing world. one of the terms in the product of terms from which we deduce future carbon emissions is global population. we tend to believe the global population will stabilize with 10 billion people by the middle of the century because the developing world will take on some of the characteristics of the western world in terms of their rate of production, for example. when you look at some of those projections, built into many of them is the assumption that the global population will eventually stabilize. if it does not do that, it means that the problem is even worse. that is the key uncertainty, the wild card. >> the bottom-line is a really nice where people are in the world, but how many people want a u.s. lifestyle. >> thomas rÜgen talks about an america that has 3 billion people. >> my name is wayne rauf. it is -- wayne rth. what will it take to make the sacrifices to save our planet? my basic metaphor for what we're doing to plan a is putting a stick in a hor
, and residents are telling us they felt surrounded. >> and when it come down, we looked and everything seemed green like it was popped off transformers left and right. we heard a noise, and then all of a sudden i took off and off and started walking down here. >> i prayed to god as loud as i could and, i was just praying for my safety. i knew that the truck was knew the truck was shaking. i just prayed that the truck stay put and that god would protect me. jamie: a lot of praying going on in that part of the country. they're used to this kind of weather, but just not now. mother nature is also taking a toll on the midwest. take a look at this, snow and ice-covered roads have forced residents to stay indoors. they're patiently waiting for the storm to pass, at least we hope so. news extreme weather center. i'm surprised, maria when we look at video how many people are on the roads. that's crazy. >> stay home today. stay home with your families if you don't have to go to work. those conditions are dangerous not just across the midwest but as we head later tonight and during evening rush and ove
advised seven u.s. presidents. this is about an hour and 15 minutes. [applause] >> i interview a lot of fantastic people in this room and that does not happen very often. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times headline proclaimed a "global warming has begun." decades later, dr. hansen and others are still trying to convince the united states of these basic observations. about half of american now accept the fact. 40% do not. over the next hour, we will discuss clients -- climate science and public opinion with james hansen. today, dr. hansen is receiving [applause] i've interviewed a lot of fantastic people in this room and that doesn't happen very often. welcome to climate one, a conversation about america's energy, economy and environment. i'm greg dalton. in 1988, nasa scientist james hansen told a congressional hearing that it was 99% certain that burning fossil fuels was heating the earth's atmosphere. the next day, a new york times head
also contact us on twitter, facebook, or by e-mail. you can see the addresses on your screen. let's start with an update on the so called "fiscal cliff." this is the washington post -- in a side arbucarticle -- that the washington post report on the fiscal cliff this morning. here's an article from "washington times" -- now this is from "politico." a situation that was in the paper couple weeks ago. looks li finally, before we go to phone calls, this article from the daily caller -- again, that is reported in the daily caller. we begin with a call from diane in julian, california, on our democratic line. caller: good morning, peter. my prediction came true, reelecting a president. women against violence acts, being held up by the house. john boehner and the republican house majority leader eric cantor. i tweeted last night quiet late saying the republicans are going to gang up on john boehner. there is an article in the new york times showing they feel he is dragging his feet and waiting until january 3. i also understand that the chairman of the government oversight and reform co
general motors buying $5.5 billion worth of stock from the u.s. government's t.a.r.p. program. and it was at a price $2 above where gm traded yesterday. that's right. we, the people, got a better deal than we could've ever hoped for just the day before. gm most likely would have been liquidated, putting more than 1 million people out of work. if the federal government hadn't bailed it out. nobody likes a bailout. people don't like to use the phrase bailout and the government isn't going to be made whole in this investment. i'm saying that point-blank. that's because it's so gigantic. the simple fact is also not only does gm exist, but it was capable of throwing off $5.5 billion to repay some of the t.a.r.p. investment. this thing was at death's door, now it's thriving, just like aig which also shouldn't have come back, but it did. those are two 2012 success stories that explain how robust corporate america really is and how unheralded that development is. what else? how about that the united states is producing more oil than any time in the last 17 years and producing enough t
's a nice reflection on us all. now through january 2nd. get 0% apr financing for 36 months on a 2013 subaru forester and we'll donate 250 dollars to your choice of 5 charities. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. but we can still help you see your big picture. with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>neil: no home and now maybe out of a temporary one with a fast approaching deadline being put out of hotel by fema. so, what was with all the politicans back patting last week? >> i was pleased and was honored to work in such a productivest that focused on getting things done. >>
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